Doodlewashes by Evy Kleveland

Today’s guest doodlewashes come to us from Evy Kleveland in Ekkerøy, Norway (follow her on Instagram!). Evy says, “I live in the very northeastern part of Norway where we have a fantastic open landscape. Last night the mountains on the other side of the fjord have been sprinkled with snow on the tops.”

The open landscape inspires her, but she didn’t want to just paint landscapes, so she made a painting project: small barns and old houses. “I have a 15 km drive along the fjord to get to work and it’s in this area where you can find many of the buildings I have painted.”

Doodlewash by Evy KlevelandEvy now has painted approximately 40 buildings, but thinks there are about 10 to go before the end of the project. These barns or sheds were used for storage of hay or fishing nets in earlier days when everybody was a farmer or a fishermen. Today there is seldom a use for these buildings and they are not maintained anymore.

“By painting and showing the paintings,” she says, “I would like to make people see these buildings with new and other eyes. Maybe they are worth restoring as a cultural heritage? After I started the project this spring, two houses have been torn down and doors have fallen off some of the barns.”

Evy has been juried to be a member of NFUK, a Norwegian artist organization, and she has two years of art education at Bergen Art School (Kunstskolen i Bergen) with professional artists as teachers. Two years ago, she attended a watercolor class in Iceland for one week with the Swedish artist Lars A Persson as a teacher and since then, she’s taken up the medium of watercolor again.

“When I go out painting, I bring a rucksack with all my painting stuff. I also bring a foldable canvas chair to sit on. I sketch the house in a little book for a couple of minutes, trying to find the right angles and sizes for the painting. Then I make a light drawing on the sheet before painting.”

She uses Arches 300g cotton sheets in blocks and prefers cold pressed to hot pressed. “But, I’ve also used Fabriano 200g cold pressed and that’s my favourite according to the flow of the paint. I would like to try some thicker Fabriano and see how that works out; 200g can be a bit thin.”

Doodlewash by Evy Kleveland“When it comes to brushes I must refer to one of my teachers who said that a brush is just a tool that helps us transporting the paint from the palette to the sheet! I use some flat brushes, up to maybe 5 cm, and some smaller round ones. Earlier I have used solid paint in squares from Winsor & Newton and also Russian honey-based paint in tubes. Nowadays I use Winsor & Newton in tubes. It`s easy to administrate the tubes.”

“I’ve found that the colours Permanent Sap Green and Transparent Yellow are great for painting the bright green summer grass,” Evy says. “Moreover I would try to get the dark colours more translucent and must find out how to mix them better.”

“I’m a plein air painter and something strange happened the other day. I had painted the sky and suddenly the wet paint on the sheet went into ice roses due to the low temperature. But when I took the sheet inside the car, the roses melted. Next time, I would let the painting dry outside and see if I can keep the roses. I’ve previously been a periodic painter, but now I’ll continue without pausing. Don’t let the winter stop us from doodlewashing! Let`s see if it’s possible to make a doodlefreeze!” (now there’s an idea!)

Thank you so much for sharing your story and your beautiful doodlewashes with us, Evy! And be sure to follow her Instagram feed for more of her beautiful work! Excited to see what you’ll paint next!

Posted by:Charlie O'Shields (doodlewash)

Creator of Doodlewash® and founder of World Watercolor Month™ (July) and World Watercolor Group™. Sharing daily watercolor illustrations and stories while proudly featuring talented artists from all over the world!

28 replies on “GUEST DOODLEWASH: Sheds by the Varanger Fjord

  1. I was trying to find words that described what see and felt and I saw kirkistan’s comment.. Perfect. I look at them and I shiver because I can almost feel the cool wind. So strange. Beautiful!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s