For today’s doodlewash we simply have an actual size rendering of a piece of kiwi on a stainless steel fork. While delicious to eat, kiwi is also used in a lot of DIY face masks, for skin beauty and anti-aging, due to the alpha hydroxy fruit acids and vitamins. Of course, you would probably want to take the fork out first. When New Zealanders first received this fruit from China, they named it Chinese gooseberry. Since huge export duties had to be paid on gooseberries, they coined the name kiwifruit instead, due to its uncanny resemblance to the little, hairy, brown flightless bird that’s their national symbol. These days, both the bird and the fruit simply go by the name kiwi.

Kiwi wasn’t a popular fruit on the menu when I was growing up. It wasn’t until my much older brother married his wife, that I even encountered one. She was what the family called a “health nut” due to her strange penchant for eating things that didn’t come in a box. Granted, bottles were fine, as those housed an endless array of vitamins, but solid food was only consumed fresh and whole. This included the then mysterious kiwi, which I remember thinking looked completely bizarre. It was pretty and green on the inside, but the outside looked like the scrotum of a wild animal. My grade school sensibilities were appalled and I refused to even try it at first.

Luckily, I changed my mind and tried this strange new food. Though it didn’t become my favorite fruit to eat, I did at least decide it was actually tasty and not terrifying. Later in life, I would learn about all the amazing health benefits that the touters like to tout, but back then things actually had to taste good in order to be consumed. I remember the first time I tried many different foods, and it’s remarkable how those memories stick. I can’t always remember the exact time and place, but I never forget that first encounter with a new food. And that’s why I’ve never forgotten that time, years ago, when I dared to try a hairy, brown fruit called kiwi.

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About the Doodlewash

M. Graham watercolors: Azo Yellow, Permanent Green Pale, Ultramarine Blue, and Burnt Sienna. Lamy Safari Al Star pen with Platinum Carbon black ink in a 5″ x 8″ 140 lb. (300 gsm) Pentalic Aqua Journal.

Posted by:Charlie O'Shields (doodlewash)

Creator of Doodlewash® and founder of World Watercolor Month™ (July) and World Watercolor Group™. Sharing daily watercolor illustrations and stories while proudly featuring talented artists from all over the world!

52 replies on “Day 17: #WorldWatercolorMonth

  1. Fork it over, you gooseberry, you!
    Aiyyyyyyyy! Stabbed in the heart.

    Charlie O’, I am afraid I will have to report you to the SPCG (Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Gooseberries)

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh! you captured the colours and the texture perfectly🙂
    I do love kiwis and that they supposedly have more vitamin C than oranges . Portugal is a producer of kiwis , as strange as it might be , and ours are actually better than the imported ones (in my humble opinion😉 )
    Turtle Hugs

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hairy scrotum of a wild animal – and you know this how?

    Tasty fruit, truly. I love a fresh fruit salad of red (strawberries) pink (raspberries) yellow (pineapple) orange (mango) blue (blueberries) dark purple (blackberries) and green (kiwi of course) Served in a clear glass bowl, looks and tastes scrumptious.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. At the moment I am laughing. Our first encounter with kiwi fruit had my husband calling them monkey balls. Way back when, late 70’s. Trying new food likened to body parts of furry animals? Not easy. Funny how it all turns out okay.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. AmaOng detail on your fork….by that I mean the reflection, as structurally forks are fairly simplic, although compared to the cutlery draw alternatives I guess they are a more complex utensil……oh basically it’s bloomin fantastic for a fork. for the kiwi, the beautiful bright green health kick, which I had never considered to look like a scrotum before, let alone a hairy wild animals bits….this could now be a problem for me, as I usually eat these things whole, that being said I am not sure this will be possible now, as I might start imagining the poor kangaroo, who could have lost his knackers? It used to be figs that I thought resembled a lost ball, with the bits inside resembling a very healthy bag of swimmers….I eat the whole of the fig too, so I guess another fruit resembling animal parts shouldn’t be a problem? 🤔😜😂😋

    Liked by 1 person

    1. HAHAHA! Oh know… now I can’t stop imagining a poor kangaroo with missing knackers! LOL 😂😂 Oh my! Yeah… best to not think too much when eating strange looking food I guess. So thrilled you like my doodlewash though! 😃💕I’ve been trying to practice more reflections this month!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. After my belly-ache laugh, courtesy REcreate…etc, I don’t know what to say! I do have a comment ‘tho — how clever of you to do the slice life-size! Beautifully rendered, Charlie (a fave fruit).

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I think your work is beautiful, wouldn’t change it, Charlie, love your pen and all of the details you get. And it’s so interesting that just when I think I see NT creeping back…….you’re getting the same effect with different colors. Loving that, I learn so much from you, bro. 💜💜💜

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Kiwis are so good when they’re ripe. It’s like candy to me. Have you tried the golden ones? Also, did you know kiwis can repair your DNA damage? Just by eating one of them can repair your DNA!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Has anyone said forking awesome yet?😉 The metals and their reflections are always a joy, and loving those greens of course!😉 I too was apprehensive of the kiwi at first. Thankfully, the inside was much more pleasant – they taste better than they first look!

    Liked by 1 person

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