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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 1,258 total)
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  • #341766
    Sandra Strait
    Participant
    @sandra-strait

    I’ve never tried it for skin tones, since I seldom do portraits, but think it would work well for it.  Just be careful if you use blue next to it because it can go green easily. Let me know how it works out!

    #235712
    Sandra Strait
    Participant
    @sandra-strait

    Unfortunately, you are probably not going to get very good results with those paints.  I haven’t tried that brand but given the price, I’m not surprised at the problems you are seeing.  Have you tried adding water to the the cakes – enough so that there is a film of water across the top – and letting it soak for 3-5 minutes? This might soften the paint enough so you can get more pigment.  Your brushes can affect how well the paint spreads too.

    It isn’t impossible to get something decent with cheaper paints, but you’ll need to use more like you are coloring than painting.

     

    #230592
    Sandra Strait
    Participant
    @sandra-strait

    Many thanks, Fifi! Buff titanium really is an under-appreciated color, so I’m happy to spread the word, lol.

    #223414
    Sandra Strait
    Participant
    @sandra-strait

    It does seem to me that the French Ultramarine is more intense and granulated more, but you’re right – there isn’t a whole lot of difference.  You might try mixing a little of each with the same yellow and same red.  Sometimes, the main difference in a color is that they create better mixes.

    Hopefully, you wanted all those paints that you accidentally won, lol!

    #223372
    Sandra Strait
    Participant
    @sandra-strait

    Hmmm.  Not sure why my replies aren’t showing up here.  You said ‘ I also heard that gouache ones are mixture of both acrylic and water paints.  Gouache has some of the same characteristics of both acrylic paint and watercolor paint, but they aren’t a mix of both.

    There are two kinds of gouache.  One is actually a watercolor and one is actually acrylic paint.  When they dry, they look very much alike. The acrylic paint version is called Acryla Gouache or Acrylic Gouache. The more traditional gouache (which has been around since Egyptian times) is called gouache, Designer’s gouache and Artist’s gouache.

    I did a write-up a while back that explains the differences and what you can expect from each kind. You can find it on my Life Imitates Doodles blog.  It isn’t a review, but an explanation of the different kinds of gouache.  It’s more important that you know which type than which brand.

    Honestly, for traditional gouache, any of the professional brands would work for you.  Holbein, M. Graham, Schmincke, Winsor & Newton are all fantastic.  Da Vinci is working on a new formulation that I think is going to be wonderful, but I’m not sure when it will be available.

    But even the most wonderful brands will have a learning curve.

    #223259
    Sandra Strait
    Participant
    @sandra-strait

    Thank you very much, Gerri!

    #223146
    Sandra Strait
    Participant
    @sandra-strait

    Thank you, Gerri! Buff Titanium really is an under appreciated color, and can be hard to find. I’m glad that Daniel Smith has kept it in their line of paints.

    #221604
    Sandra Strait
    Participant
    @sandra-strait

    Larry, I’m glad I could help.  If you think of the other technique, please share it with us.  I always like to learn new techniques and I know I’m not the only here, who does!

    #221576
    Sandra Strait
    Participant
    @sandra-strait

    I would do these by lifting color or softening color by applying something that is drier. Wet follows dry.

    If the darker paint is still wet/damp:

    • fold a paper towel/tissue and touch it along the edge, letting it soak up color, OR
    • run a dry brush along the edge to pick up the color

    You can also pick up less color, by using a damp brush that is drier than the paint.

    If the paint has dried:

    Run a damp brush along the edge to wet it.  Gently squeeze water from the brush with a towel or cloth or switch to a dry brush – the brush must be drier than the newly wetted area.  Run it along the same edge, so that the now wet paint will flow to the brush. It’s a little trickier when the paint has dried, and you might have to go through the process more than once.

    There are several factors than can affect the outcome.  Some paints are staining and you might be able to lighten a little, but not much.  Some papers don’t allow you to lift well.  They absorb the color too much and won’t let go or they may just turn to mush and get icky.  And, brushes vary in how much water they hold – so some will always be too wet or too dry.

    This can be a tricky thing to do, and may take practice.

    There may be other methods, but this is the only one I know. I hope it helps.

     

    #216570
    Sandra Strait
    Participant
    @sandra-strait

    Sounds like great fun was had by all!

    #216517
    Sandra Strait
    Participant
    @sandra-strait

    Very helpful advice, Stephanie!

    #213171
    Sandra Strait
    Participant
    @sandra-strait

    Finding a good way to promote what you are offering is half the battle.  You know you are delivering good content by the number of returning students.  I’m so glad you found a venue that gets the word out to those who want your classes!

    #210909
    Sandra Strait
    Participant
    @sandra-strait

    Your students all look intent and caught up in what they are doing – always a good sign!

    For adding photos here, look at the icons in the bar above the text you are entering.  The very last on the right shows a mountain with a dot (probably supposed to be the moon).  If you click on that a window opens that allows you to browse your phone/laptop/etc.  and find the photo you want to add.

    You do need to put some text between each photo, even if just an ‘x’.  At least it used to be that way.  I haven’t tried in a while.

     

    #210696
    Sandra Strait
    Participant
    @sandra-strait

    It all sounds like great fun!  If you have problems finding a photo that suits, there are lots of big sky photos that can be used without giving credit or royalties at Pixabay.com.

    #207734
    Sandra Strait
    Participant
    @sandra-strait

    Wow! A trip to Kenya! How exciting.  I love your idea of using tracing paper to check proportions.  I’ve used acetate in a similar way, with a pen that can be wiped off so the plastic can be reused.  Having the tracing paper would be nice to keep for later reference though.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 1,258 total)